Taste of Balinese Foods

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THE FOOD OF BALI INDONESIA

 

Balinese food celebrate Balinese people from the volcanic island of Bali using spices blending with the fresh vegetables, meat and seafood. Balinese food sometime refers to special regional Indonesian cuisine. It demonstrates indigenous traditions and other Indonesian regional cuisine, Chinese and Indian. Bali's culinary traditions are somewhat distinct with the rest of Indonesia. The people Bali celebrate their foods with festivals and celebrations.

 

 

INGREDIENTS

Spices such as Kaempferia galanga galangal, shallots, garlic, turmeric, ginger and Kaffir lime are used in Balinese foods. For example popular Balinese 8-spice is made with white and black pepper, coriander, cumin, clove, nutmeg, sesame seed, and candlenut. Other ingredients such as palm sugar, fish paste, and basa gede spice paste are used in everyday dishes.

Many tropical foods are rambutan, mangoes, mangosteen, bananas, jackfruit, rambutan, passion fruit, nangka, pineapple, salak snake fruit, duku, kelengkeng, wani white mango or Mangifera caesia, papaya, longan, melon, oranges, custard-apple, coconut and durian.

Steamed rice is commonly consumed in every meal everyday. Pork, chicken, seafood and vegetables are widely consumed. Because many Balinese follow Hindu tradition so they never or rarely consume beef.

Taste of Balinese Foods

Experiences

What's In Indian Pantry Staples?

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Ghee

Ghee gives the rich and distinctive flavour to Indian foods. Ghee is made from clarified butter and has high burning point. You can make your own by adding a block of butter to a saucepan. Heat it up until it begins to look foamy. You’ll notice the milk solids will sink in the bottom of the pan. Drain the clear butter off the top and discard the remaining solids. You will need to pour the ghee through a cheese cloth (or clean chux) to strain. Store at room temperature for up to 3 months.  

Malai

A thick cream that you can buy from Middle Eastern and Indian grocers. Alternatively, just use thick cream from the supermarket.

Cooking Oils

  • Coconut oil
  • Vegetable oil
  • Ghee
  • Mustard oil

Peanut, sunflower, rice bran, grape seed or canola oil can be used in your kitchen as alternatives.

Paneer

Paneer is an Indian style cottage cheese made from simple pantry ingredients. It can be added to vegetable dishes for taste and texture.

To make your paneer, bring 2L milk and 1 tsp salt to the boil. Turn the heat off and give the milk a stir. Add 100ml white vinegar and wait 15 mins until the curds rise to the top. Ladle the curds into a colander lined with cheese cloth (or clean chux). Make sure the colander is placed over a bowl to catch any excess liquid! Leave for 30mins to strain, then wring out any extra whey to make a firmer style cheese. You can also buy this from Indian grocers.

Rice

Cook using Basmati for an authentic, fluffy style rice!

Tamarind

Normally you can purchase it in a block or pureed in jars. It’s most convenient to buy the jar so you don't have to spend time to process the paste. This is done by soaking the dried tamarind block in boiling water and pressing it through a sieve.

Yoghurt

You can use natural, unsweetened yoghurt. Greek or thick yoghurts are okay as long as they are labelled as plain. 

Spice Blends

Commercial curry powder isn’t really used in India as people vary spice combinations to suit different dishes as they cook. If you are going to buy some ready-made curry powders, you might want to get them from a reputable spice merchant or specialty Indian grocer. Making up your own spice mix is an art, but a lot of fun to make!

Common Spices 

  • Cumin seeds or powder
  • Nigella seeds
  • Mustard seeds (black, brown, yellow)
  • Black peppercorns
  • Green and black cardamom pods
  • Cinnamon- whole sticks and powder
  • Chilli - fresh green or red, dried whole or powder
  • Cloves
  • Coriander seeds
  • Curry leaves - fresh or dry
  • Fennel seeds
  • Fenugreek
  • Mace
  • Nutmeg
  • Saffron
  • Turmeric ground
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The Food Of India

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THE CURRY

"Curry" is not a word in India. No Indian would ever really refer to an Indian dish with gravy or sauce as a "curry," because the word isn’t even in the language. Curry to most people is a rich, flavourful gravy which has vegetables or meat. British culture generically labelled the term used to describe any dish in Indian cuisine. Curry powder, which doesn’t exist in Indian cooking, is equally a part of that narrative.

There are a few specific dishes in India whose names sound like "curry." One is "Kadhi," and another is "Kari." Both of them are sauce like dish with a gravy. Allegedly the British did not grasp these were names for those specific dishes, assuming all dishes containing gravy were referred to as "curries." This created an entire new category of Indian cuisine. As a result, Westerners were introduced to the idea that all dishes with a sauce from India were referred to that way.

Indian cuisine reflects an 8,000-year history of various groups and cultures interacting with the subcontinent, leading to diversity of flavours and regional cuisines. Foreign invasions, trade relations and colonialism have played a role in introducing certain foods to the country. For instance, potatoes and cauliflower were brought to India by the British. The Portuguese introduced chillies and breadfruit. Indian cuisine has shaped the history of international relations; the spice trade between India and the rest of the world was paramount in shaping what we now eat today.

EATING

In India, meals are traditionally brought to the table on a large serving platter called a thali. Thali is a Hindi word meaning "a large plate." However, in recent years the meaning of the term has expanded. Now, it’s a commonly used expression for a style of eating. Thali the meal refers to many different dishes served in small bowls (called katori), arranged on a platter. Platters can also have small, divided sections built into the stainless-steel serving ware. Dhal, vegetables, flatbreads, rice, pickle, salad, and dessert are often included. Thali at restaurants, festivals and weddings are generally a set meal with an "all you can eat" philosophy. Waiters will continuously serve you until you are full!

Customarily, meals in India were either eaten seated on the floor, or on very low stools or cushions. Food is most often eaten with the right hand rather than using cutlery. Some Indians today adopt a spoon and fork, but when it comes to flatbreads- naan, chapati, paratha or roti is used to scoop up a meal.

In South India, cleaned banana leaves are used as a plate, which can be disposed of or fed to cattle after the meal. When hot food is served on banana leaves, they add distinctive aroma and taste to the food. Leaf plates are especially common at celebratory occasions.

DRINKS

Drinks are particularly important in India, where temperatures regularly top 40 degrees Celsius in the spring and summer months. Many Indians start their day with a cup of chai, a tea flavoured milk with spices and sugar. Cooler drinks include fresh lemonades, coconut water and lassi, a yogurt (and sometimes fruit) based beverage blended with spices. India’s own selection of alcoholic drinks include palm wine, whiskey and beer, the most iconic brand being Kingfisher.

COOKING EQUIPMENT

  • Gas or electric stoves
  • Spice grinder or mortar and pestle
  • Heavy frying pan
  • Saucepan
  • Pressure cooker
  • Tandoor oven  
  • Karahi/Kadai

INGREDIENTS

Staple foods of Indian cuisine include rice, wholemeal flour, lentils, peas and mung beans. Lentils may be consumed whole, husked or even split and are used daily in a variety of ways. Some pulses such as chickpeas, kidney beans and black-eyed peas are very common in the north. Besan, a type of flour made from chickpeas is widely used throughout India.

Many Indian dishes are cooked in vegetable oil, but ghee (clarified butter) is popular in northern India, mustard oil in the east, and coconut oil along the south west coast, especially in Kerala. Many types of meat are used for Indian cooking, but chicken, goat and lamb tend to be the most common. Fish and seafood consumption is prevalent in some parts of India, but aren’t widely consumed except for coastal areas.

The most important and frequently used spices in Indian cuisine are chilli, black mustard seed, cardamom, cumin, turmeric, asafoetida, ginger, coriander, and garlic. Some leaves commonly used for flavouring include bay, coriander, fenugreek, and mint. The use of curry leaves for flavouring is typical of Gujarati and South Indian cuisine. The sweet dishes are often seasoned with cardamom, saffron, nutmeg, and rose water.

Indian meals also feature a range of accompaniments to add textures such as nuts or dry fish. Chutney, fruits and pickles enhance flavour with tang and salt. Raitas and yoghurt (fresh curd) have a cooling effect on spicy dishes.

REGIONAL FOODS

In a country with 28 states and hundreds of languages, cuisine differs across India's diverse regions. Variations in local culture, geographic location and economics all have an impact. Food also changes seasonally, depending on which fruits or vegetables are ripe and what proteins and herbs are available. The main features and differences between North and South Indian Cuisine are:

NORTH

  • Rich meat dishes accompanied by breads such as naan, roti, chapati, parathas
  • Fried street foods like samosas, pakoras or kebabs
  • Spices including garam masala and amchur (dried mango powder)
  • Use of yoghurt and other dairy products
  • Fenugreek, bay and coriander leaves
  • The use of a tandoor oven
  • Middle eastern influences

SOUTH

  • Rice, lentils and stews
  • Rice or lentil-based breads/pancakes such as dosa, idlis and vada
  • Tamarind and sambar powder
  • Fresh or dried curry leaves
  • Seafood and fish
  • Coconut and coconut milk
  • Sometimes the use of beef or pork in Christian communities
  • Whole mustard seeds are common

RELIGIOUS DIETS

In India people often follow dietary restrictions based on their religion or faith.

  • Beef is taboo in Hindu communities. Cows are believed to be ‘holy’, providing various items including dairy (milk, yoghurt, butter, ghee, cream and cheese), transport/labour and dung for fuelling fires, fertiliser and building materials.
  • Islam faith does not allow the consumption of pork or alcohol. Halal products must be derived from animals and/or poultry that have been prepared according to Islamic law.
  • Buddhist’s aim to avoid harming any living thing, which leads to a mostly vegetarian diet.
  • Sikhs will exclude from their diet: eggs, fish and any ingredients with animal derivatives or cooked in animal fat. Dairy produce is acceptable providing it is free from animal fat.
  • Some temple diets are free from garlic, onion or any other stimulants like caffeine in attempt to calm the body, encouraging a meditative state. 

FOOD OUTSIDE OF INDIA

Indian migration has spread culinary traditions of the subcontinent throughout the world. Indian cuisine has been adapted to local tastes, sometimes sparking creations of entirely new dishes. Chicken tikka masala, kedgeree and butter chicken from Australia or the UK are great examples.

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Home Cooked Goodness Kid Classes

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Monday Class with meals sent to Belgium Avenue and Collingwood Neighbourhood Houses (BANH) 

OTAO Kitchen was buzzing on Monday, and thanks to your efforts, 30 portions of beef lasagne were made as well as 80 Chinese custard tarts and 53 pear tarts. The prepared food was sampled by all for lunch, and given the thumbs up! 👍 

These delicious meals were collected by Sue who will be serving them at the Belgium Avenue and Collingwood Neighbourhood Houses (BANH) weekly community meals.

The weekly lunches at BANH brings people together and directly addresses isolation, loneliness and ensures a healthy meal becomes a staple diet to those most disadvantaged in our community.

These lunches are only possible through the generosity of people like YOU. Thank you for donating your time, talent, and treasure. We salute you. 

If you feel inspired to do more, keep in mind out KiP MWL cooking roster. You can sign up here. The recipes from the session yesterday can be found below.

Beef lasagne
Veggie lasagne
Chinese custard Tart
Pear Tart

Kip is striving to create the most engaging, exciting, and meaningful experiences to help foster the next generation of changemakers, but they need your help. Please complete this super quick survey and let us know what we can improve on for next time.

Tuesday Class with meal sent to Uniting Care formerly Prahran Mission

 

What an amazing morning. The KiP OTAO team were blown away today by the focus, dedication and creativity from you all. Definitely some chefs in the making here!

OTAO Kitchen was a hive of activity - 42 portions of lasagne were made as well as 72 Chinese custard tarts and 41 pear tarts. The prepared food was sampled by all for lunch, and given the thumbs up! 👍 

These delicious meals were collected by Rosa and the team from Uniting Care (formerly Prahran Mission) where it will be served for their Easter Lunch on Thursday. They are enormously grateful for the food and wanted to share the message below with you all;

"I just want to thank you so much for all you do, it’s truly amazing! It was such a heart-warming experience and I only wish the kids would be able to see the faces of the recipients and know how much it means to them. Not only was it amazing to receive the food but the cards they made are even more special. 
 
Thanking you for the amazing work you do, it will definitely make a difference."


Thank you for donating your time, talent, and treasure today. We salute you. 

If you feel inspired to do more, keep in mind out KiP MWL cooking roster. You can sign up here. The recipes from the session today can be found below.

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Last Minute Melbourne Experience Booking

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Explore most amazing food culture experiences, from the dumplings to Indian curries. Gorgeous ideas to take friends and family to have social cooking time, enjoy delicious foods and learn tips and trick.

Plus we do the dishes so no mess at home so join in the classes. We offer more classes in the week than ever so plenty for you to choose. The class include meals, cooking, entertainment and wine - there has never been a better time to cook. Otao Kitchen has the best kitchen studio, so get ready to cook?

 

How to buy on a budget the best kitchen knife?

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A special step in becoming a good home cook is to have a good set of kitchen knives and learn to sharpen your kitchen knives at your own home.

You might be curious to know what is included in a basic kitchen knife set. There are four styles of chef’s knives and how we would tell you to determine which kitchen chef’s knife is right for you.  Because out of all of your kitchen knives, your kitchen chef’s knife will be your most used tool in your home. 

Even though the market is filled with various styles of kitchen knives, it all comes down to finding a chef kitchen knife that fits your own hand – for it will be the kitchen knife that will take your cooking to much higher levels.

If you are a home cook or a chef, it can be overwhelming knowing what to look for in a kitchen knife with shapes, handles, blades, knife set, sizes, steels and finishes. Choosing a kitchen knife is not as hard you might think, it just seems like it because of all the choices available. The cost and the fear of getting it wrong can be stressful but don't worry, we're here to help you figure it all out and get you a knife so sharp your onions will cry in fear.

Let's cover one the biggest fears first - a good knife can cost a lot of money and it's sometimes scary hovering over at the kitchen store or online. When you buy a kitchen knife in Australia, you're buying something you should be able to use for the rest of your life if you look after it. When a chef decides to buy knives they look for something to use daily and for his and his cooking career because they learn how they can look after their kitchen knives.

It's not the most efficient way to use your knife on a tomato, capsicum or eggplant.  It's a great demonstration of the sharpness of kitchen knives. If your current knife can't manage this, it might be time for you to think about sharpen your kitchen knives or upgrade to something better.

We often get asked for a recommendation and we nearly always give the same answer if a customer doesn't have a specific style in mind or they're after a general use chef knife and that's to buy something from the range. They have it all - beauty, sharpness, a quality edge and hard wearing carbon steel and an excellent price tag. 

If you're after a little more then we recommend heading to the homepage and browsing all our ranges where we've written about and reviewed each knife and and there's a good selection to choose from to cater to all tastes and budgets. 

It's worth bearing in mind that because nearly all of the knives on the site are handmade in small forges by one or two blacksmiths and as such supply is not guaranteed and when a knife has sold out it can sometimes take months to restock. 

If you're keen on a particular knife don't leave it too long to buy it because it might be gone and in the case of some ranges for several months or more.

Read more here as we will guide 7 steps for you how to choose the best kitchen knife for your home. 

It is Good to Drink Green Tea Everyday

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Japanese Cooking Master Class

Japanese Cooking Master Class

Inspired with simplicity and popular foods of Japan. Brilliant for things to do in the weekend, gift voucher or...

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Explore Melbourne Food Tour Followed by a Fun Cooking Experience!

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If you are on the lookout for an exciting food adventure, Melbourne should be on your next travel destination list. Visit Lygon St for a classic Italian meal, explore the CBD area to hunt for the best dumpling in town and if you are a fan of Vietnamese food, immerse yourself in the flavours of Vietnamese cuisine at Richmond or Footscray. Not forgetting the famous Queen Victoria Market filled with endless food stalls with an amazing array of fresh seafood, cheese and seasonal produce.

Do you want to go beyond the ordinary food tour and immerse yourself in an exciting cooking experience while eating and drinking altogether? Join Otao Kitchen’s best Melbourne food tour with Private Food and Cooking tour as it includes:

A stroll through some of Melbourne’s historic neighbourhoods and exploring many Asian food hotspots, guided by Chef Ha

Learn fascinating history, culture, food industry and the Vietnamese community

Highlight some of the best restaurants throughout Richmond on Victoria St

Shop at some of the oldest Asian Groceries that offer a variety of Asian cooking sauces, fresh seasonal produce and exotic fruits.

An exclusive private cooking class where you will learn the essential ingredients to use to make an authentic Asian meal

Gain some basic cooking techniques and skills and indulge in the satisfaction of creating a meal

If you have something specific in mind, please get in touch so we can work something out together.  Call 0408 217 899 if you have any queries.  

Market Tour and Asian Cooking

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How To Make Your Own Dressing

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Simple. Add lemon juice, bit of vinegar, honey, oil and bit of garlic or shallot in a jar. Put the lid on and shake it well. It taste much better than the jar you bought and cheaper too.

Visit https://www.otaokitchen.com.au/recipes/

Alternatively you can whisk them.

Thai Cooking Master Class

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Store Your Spice Like No Other

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Cinnamon, cumin, coriander, cardamom, black beans, red chilli flakes, nutmeg, allspice, black pepper and ginger. These are just a few of the spices that are used. Storage for my heaps of spices has been a challenge in the kitchen as often they are in little bags, jars and this drifts on to the shelves and cupboards. I thought I could share with you some practical ways that keeps my spices fresh and neat. 

Remember to make sure your spices are fresh.

Remember to place the frequent used spices in the front and the less frequent used spices in the back.

How do you store your spices? Do you keep them in the cupboard, or in a drawer? 

Indian Cooking Master Class

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Why Good Kitchen Practice Can Change Your Cooking Forever

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Vegan Cooking Master Class

Vegan Cooking Master Class

Explore vibrant spices, beautiful sauces, fresh vegetables, tofu and beans in vegan cooking. If Asian vegan dishes...

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Vegetarian is not a dirty word

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Researchers argue that while the human body can digest meat, we are actually designed to be herbivores. For example; our molars are flat and blunt making them more ideal for grinding, not gnashing and tearing. All herbivores share this same feature.

People often mistakenly associate a vegetarian diet with low energy levels and poor health. But did you know that soybeans actually contain more protein per quantity than pork or chicken? And a plant-based diet actually increases the body’s metabolism, burning calories up to 16% faster compared to a meat-based diet! Fruit also contains natural sugars that are low GI giving you a fantastic natural source of energy that will last longer without that nasty come down effect.

Cooking vegetarian recipes is not only easy and delicious, there are many added health benefits and dollar savings to be had. Vietnamese vegetarian uses a mass of fresh, tasty and sustainable ingredients.

In our new Veg Out Vegetarian cooking class, you will discover a range of tantalising recipes that will deliciously add to your existing cooking repertoire.

Join Chef Ha who will teach you how to make Vegetable rice paper rolls, a sizzling Vietnamese pancake filled with mushroom, mung beans and sprouts, and tofu in a zingy tomato, chilli and spring onion sauce. Finish it all off with the incredible ‘Che Bap’; a beautiful sweet corn, sesame and coconut milk dessert!

OTAO Kitchen’s Veg Out Vegetarian cooking classes kick off this week - 7 Feb @ 11am.

We have a special introductory price just for you if you get in quick!

Don’t have a cow man. Go Veg with OTAO.

Vegan Cooking Master Class

Vegan Cooking Master Class

Explore vibrant spices, beautiful sauces, fresh vegetables, tofu and beans in vegan cooking. If Asian vegan dishes...

Duration 3 Hours

From AUD $185 Book now