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Masala Spice Mixes
Masala Spice Mixes
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One popular spice mix is garam masala, a powdered blend that typically has five or more dried spices. These can include cardamom, black pepper, coriander, cumin, cinnamon, nutmeg and clove. Each culinary region (even household) has a distinctive garam masala blend and individual chefs will also have their own. This spice blend has so many uses.

Chaat Masala is used in cooking and sprinkled on top of Indian snacks for a real flavour kick!

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Making Flatbread On Your Stovetop
Making Flatbread On Your Stovetop
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Flatbreads are one of the simplest forms of bread to make at home. They make an all-purpose accompaniment to any meal, which is why most cultures around the world have their own version. Their uses range from sandwiches and wraps, to mopping up stews, soups, curries and sauces. Here are our 4 favourite varieties of flatbread from the Indian subcontinent!

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The Sattvic Diet
The Sattvic Diet
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Ayurveda is a system of medicine with historical roots in the Indian subcontinent. Modernised practices derived from this ancient tradition are considered a type of alternative medicine. In Ayurveda, the emphasis is on a Sattvic diet for healthy living, particularly for keeping minds clear, happy and at peace. The original Sattvic diet was devised for the development of higher consciousness.

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Cooking With Legumes & Pulse
Cooking With Legumes & Pulse
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What's The Difference?

Generally, they refer to the same group of foods, but there are a few minor differences. The word ‘pulse’ describes crops harvested for their dry grains, such as lentils or chickpeas. Pulses are part of the legume family, but the name ‘pulse’ refers only to the dried inner seed. The term ‘legume’ includes those dry grains, as well as fresh peas, beans and crops such as soya beans and peanuts. Think of legumes as the plants whose fruit is enclosed in a pod. Variances between the two terms are small, so it’s easy to see how use them interchangeably. Legumes and pulses come in a variety of shapes, sizes and colours and can be consumed in many forms including whole or split, ground into flours or separated into fractions such as protein, fibre and starch.

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Indian Pantry Staples
Indian Pantry Staples
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Ghee

Ghee gives the rich and distinctive flavour to Indian foods. Ghee is made from clarified butter and has high burning point. You can make your own by adding a block of butter to a saucepan. Heat it up until it begins to look foamy. You’ll notice the milk solids will sink in the bottom of the pan. Drain the clear butter off the top and discard the remaining solids. You will need to pour the ghee through a cheese cloth (or clean chux) to strain. Store at room temperature for up to 3 months.  

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The Food Of India
The Food Of India
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Indian food is so incredibly varied and is well known for producing unbelievable flavour combinations. Some being tangy, spicy, creamy, rich, subtle, pungent, mild or hot and more! Some of us might associate Indian food as "curry", but the fact is it incorporates a range of dishes made up of different combinations of spices and herbs. It encompasses a broad category that contains a lot of different cultural and historical points. So, let's clarify what's going on with this whole myth of curry!

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Asian Noodles
Asian Noodles
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The term ‘noodles’ was manufactured the west, describing foods that are long and stringy. However, in China, a noodle is not called a ‘noodle’, it is called ‘miàn’ or ‘mein’.  Miàn is not related to the shape of the food, but the fact it is made from flour in a liquid. Funnily enough in this sense, dumplings and tortellini are both are miàn! The Malaysian word ‘mee’ is derived from the Chinese name.

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Rice Guide
Rice Guide
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Rice is one of the most used grains on the planet. It’s a staple food for a large portion of the world’s population with hundreds of varieties. When selecting rice, enthusiasts will look carefully for the colour, fragrance, flavour and texture.

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Stir-Frying At Home
Stir-Frying At Home
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Stir-frying is a method of cooking where ingredients are fried in a small amount of very hot oil while being stirred. This technique originated in China but has spread into other parts of Asia and the West. To traditionally stir-fry, the most obvious tool you need is a good wok and spatula. However, if you don’t have a wok, that shouldn’t stop you! Simply use a large, wide frying pan with some other basic pantry ingredients. You’ll soon be able to whip up the most delicious stir-fry recipes.

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